Wednesday, September 17, 2014

New routines don't come easy...or do they?

After essentially (and unintentionally...oops) taking the summer off from blogging, I am happy to be jumping back in. C just started kindergarten a few weeks ago, and she is LOVING it so far. (Cue Major Sigh of Relief.) What I thought would be a massive nightmare of a new routine is actually going quite smoothly. Yes, she's wiped out at the end of the day, but she's making new friends, learning tons, and adapting as well as any almost-six year old could possibly be expected to. Even the bus ride has been great: on the first day of school, C gave me and my husband each a big hug, and skipped to the bus like she'd been doing it for years. My eyes welled up with proud tears as I waved goodbye to my big girl — she was more than ready, and excited for her new routine. I credit her readiness in part to our incredibly well-prepared school district; over the last several months, we've attended multiple events, including a bus run where all of the incoming kindergarteners get on school buses and ride around the block, several weeks before school starts. We also talked extensively at home about how things would be different, set up play dates with new friends, went school-supply shopping together, and tried to help C get ready as best as we could.

And that brings me to a work-related thought: if a new project or process is presented to you, and discussed in detail multiple times before it's actually ever implemented, it suddenly becomes much less "scary." I just came back from the Property Solutions Summit in Park City, Utah, where three of my colleagues and I attended in-depth training sessions, picked the brains of product developers/managers, absorbed the wisdom of industry peers, and networked the heck out of a jam-packed three days. After all of that, I am recharged, informed, and incredibly excited about making some possible changes to our existing marketing/technology mix.

Change can be scary, but it doesn't have to be. Ask good questions, test things out, and suddenly, you find yourself not only ready for change, but welcoming it with open arms. (Though nothing is final at this point, we are certainly making progress, and that is always a good thing in my book!)

PS: The Summit was absolutely amazing: location, content, networking — everything you hope for in a conference. Check out #PSsummit for the highlights.